Categories
Treatment

Harmful

“Challenging behavior” is a caregiver complaint […] not a patient complaint.

Clarissa Kripke

.

[…] Just as there’s a huge difference between screaming because you want to be obnoxious and deafen someone, and screaming because you’re in agony, what Alfred is doing is not aggression.

Cantatrice

.

But context matters. There is a difference between doing something harmful on purpose, and doing something because you’re overloaded and haven’t figured out how to act better while overloaded. There’s a difference between being unable to recognize faces and being indifferent to others. Intent isn’t magic, it doesn’t always make actions less harmful, but it does change what should be done about them and how they should be see.

Ruti Regan

.

In my case, yes, I would have violent angry explosions, and to attack others in such a way was wrong. I do not dispute that.

However, what was also wrong was the fact that others were allowed to torment me with impunity before, during, and after my explosion. What was also wrong was the fact that my attempts to resolve the situation non-violently were ignored or sabotaged […]

ischemgeek

.

Categories
Treatment

Quality

broadly speaking, biomedical protocols/treatments/etc meant to help autistic people range from useful to quackery

broadly speaking, i think the best way to distinguish useful treatments from harmful ones is to look at whether or not they stand to benefit the autistic person themself, rather than simply those around them.

while ‘quality of life’ is an incredibly arbitrary and ableist term invented by and for neurotypical, able-bodied people, it is true that if a treatment genuinely helps to improve an autistic person’s sense of satisfaction with themselves and their own life, and makes them more able to do the things that make them happy, it is probably a useful treatment.

the point is, i don’t think it’s fair to dismiss a broad category of treatment just because a more specific one doesn’t work; autism doesn’t exist as a separate entity, but autistic people exist, and our symptoms are incredibly multifaceted; some can be treated pretty well, and others we neither want nor need treated at all.

this is why my bottom line for the usefulness of a treatment is whether or not it does anything for the person’s happiness.

if someone is going through a treatment that makes them miserable for symptoms that don’t impede their health and happiness in the first place, it’s worth questioning whether the treatment is worthwhile at all.

Meredith K Ultra, zeke

.

“Drugs” are not a lumped-together category that can be commented on with any degree of specificity. Specific drugs on the other hand are.

Mel Baggs

.

People who want to alter their own mental state by ingesting a substance should be able to buy that product with informed consent […] what is called food

People who want to use drugs for that purpose and give informed consent should be able to buy drugs as well. That includes children. Minors can’t consent in the legal sense, but in practice with a truly caring parent, a little information and some yes-or-no questions go a long way.

The problem with psychiatry is the corruption and incompetence among the people recommending which drugs to take, not the chemical content of the drugs themselves.

The Trender System

.

Categories
Treatment

Evidence-based

Therapy is more art than science. Be suspicious of people who claim that their approach is strictly evidence based. […]

Ruti Regan

.

I’m finding myself increasingly annoyed by the emphasis on evidence-based practice in the autism world. This is not because I don’t see the value in responsible intervention practices that are consistent with research and theory.

However, I’m not convinced that championing ‘evidence-based practices’ is the most useful way of confronting quackery.

Having a randomized-controlled trial showing that your intervention does what it is supposed to is great, but there are some areas where quantitative evidence runs into limitations.

  • There are many outcomes we can measure, but are all of them the right outcomes to measure?
  • How good are we at measuring things?
  • Some interventions are harder to study than others.
  • Even if it is easy to study a given intervention or measure a given outcome, researchers might not be interested in doing so.
  • Evidence-based practice is something that typically comes at the group level.
  • There seem to be many areas where quantitative evidence alone is insufficient.
  • Realistically, we’re not going to ever be able to develop the sort of evidence base for all the things we think work that we would like.

Based on a post by Patrick Dwyer

.

Categories
Treatment

Frame

Catastrophe tends to be composed not of a monolithic event but of a welter of little incidents, many of which bear no apparent relationship to one another – unless we look long and close.

Language, in ordering these incidents into recognizable patterns, counteracts disorientation and disintegration.

This process of making sense of a flood of random data also produces the impression – generally quite groundless – of control, which may save one’s sanity even though it can’t save one’s own or anyone else’s life.

Out of context; Laura A. Milner, N. Mairs

.

[Myths based on absolutes] are true some of the time, or even lots of the time, but they do not capture everyone’s experiences.

The problem is that when a whole stack of people agree on an absolute […] it creates a culture where people who don’t fit are not invited to share their experience. If that culture becomes rigid and deeply embedded, then people who don’t fit will be ignored and excluded even when they do. […]

Frameworks are really valuable […] but I believe that holding any framework too tightly, or trying to force a framework into a situation or onto a person when it isn’t fitting, when it’s creating instead of alleviating stress is wrong and harmful! Some people don’t get stressed, they just exit the supports […] alienated from the community […]

Out of context, Sarah K Reece

.